Why You Must Use Online Video For Your Business

by Megan Macedo

 

If you’re like most business owners, the thought of doing video makes you nervous.

That’s ok, it means you’re human!

I’m going to talk about it anyway for one reason: EVERY business owner I’ve worked with over the past year who has achieved big results fast, has done it using online video.

One site we built went from zero to £180,000 in sales in the first 4 months. The key? Online video.

I talk a lot to business owners about using online video and many are reluctant to do it because they think it’s difficult to do, time consuming and you need expensive equipment to do it. None of this is true so keep reading!

You might still think that online video is quite new and while it might be nice to use it, it’s not essential. I hear that a lot too, and it couldn’t be further from the truth. Every single minute, 60 hours of video are uploaded to YouTube so video is not new!

Truth Bomb time: If you want to succeed online, video is essential.

Click play on the video to hear more about the 5 reasons why video is essential to generating leads and sales online:

 

5 Reasons Why Video is Essential to Generating Leads and Sales Online

  1. Attention

Video grabs attention like nothing else. While people generally won’t read everything you’ve written on a web page, they are very likely to click play on a video if there’s one on the page.

  1. Communication

Video is the next best thing to talking to your prospect one to one. It allows you to convey emotion and personality. You can connect with the viewer through video and it lets them feel a more personal connection with you. They’ll almost feel like they’ve met you… and you can have this running automatically for every single person who visits your site.

  1. Multiple Modalities

We all have different learning styles and absorb information in different ways. Some people learn best through particular modalities, e.g. some people learn best by reading text, others absorb the message best if they hear it or if they see a visual representation. Using video allows you to hit multiple modalities so that 100% of your audience really ‘hears’ what you’re saying, regardless of their learning style.

  1. Instant Expert Factor

Using video immediately sets you apart from the competition and elevates you to expert status. By talking about your field in online videos, you are positioning yourself as an authority. We are so conditioned to look up to people who are on screen, make a few videos and you’ll soon be a celebrity in your industry!

  1. SEO

According to a study by Forrester Research, it is 50 times easier to get a video to rank on the first page of Google than it is to get a standard web page to rank on page one. I always teach and recommend ‘Leverged SEO‘ rather than SEO for SEO’s sake, and optimising your online videos is a perfect opportunity to leverage your marketing activites for an organic search boost. The easiest way to get started is to upload your video to YouTube and be sure to use relevant keywords in the video filename (before you upload it), the video title, description and tags.

4 Ways To Use Video On Your Site

There are lots of ways you can use video on your site to improve your marketing, connect better with your customers and get more leads and sales. The main ways you can use video on your website to improve your marketing results are:

  1. Video as Regular Content

This is where a video is available to watch on your web page without any registration or sign up required. You can use video like this to connect better with your audience and make sure they really ‘get’ your message.

  1. Video as a Lead Capture Offer

This is where you make a video that a website visitor can only view after they give you their details (usually their email address). A lead capture offer is something that you offer to give your website visitors in exchange for their details.

E.g. You’ve probably seen restaurants or other businesses offering you a free discount voucher if you give them your name and email address. Once you have a visitor’s email address or other contact details you then have a lead you can follow up with.

Lead capture offers don’t have to be discounts, in fact, I usually recommend that you avoid giving discounts like the plague! A video packed with useful information is a great lead capture offer.

E.g. If you design and sell kitchens, then your website visitors are likely to happily give you their email address if you offer them a video that tells them ‘the 3 common mistakes that people make when buying a new kitchen and how to avoid them’.

  1. Video Squeeze Page

This is where you use a short video to tell prospects to sign up to receive something – e.g. “Hi, I’m Jim from A1 Kitchen Designs, I’ve put together a free report that tells you the 3 common mistakes that people make when buying a new kitchen and how to avoid them. Put your name and email address in the box next to this video and I’ll send you the free report straight away.”

It’s called a video ‘squeeze page’ because it’s designed to ‘squeeze’ out some contact details before you provide something of value to your visitor.

  1. Reverse Squeeze Page

This is where you give away some free content immediately in a video and then tell people to sign up for part two of the video. E.g. Let’s stick with our “3 common mistakes people make when buying a new kitchen and how to avoid them”. In this case video 1 would include:

– an introduction that articulates the visitor’s problem (they need a new kitchen),
– why a solution is so important (it’s pretty devastating to fork out thousands of pounds on a kitchen that you end up hating after 2 weeks of using it), and
– the first common mistake people make when buying a new kitchen.

You would then ask them to enter their email address to get access to the second part of the video, which would cover the remaining mistake 2 and 3 and how to avoid them. The second part of the video would end with a conclusion where you ask the viewer to take some action (contact you, book a consultation etc).

Mo’ Video, Mo’ Money

The more you use video the more you get access to all the benefits we talked about at the beginning of this article…and the more leads, sales and money you get.

It’s also important to note that even a video that contains no useful content as such, and just gives instructions for what the viewer should do next (leave their email address to receive something), still has many of the benefits of creating a personal interaction with your potential customers.

Using (and testing) a combination of the ways you can use video allows you to get the benefits and capture leads at the same time.

As a general rule we also stick to a limit of one video per page, otherwise it can get overwhelming for the visitor and makes them less likely to play any of the videos. With only one video on the page there is no question about what is the most important one to watch.

Your Video Challenge

Abraham Maslow said “You will either step forward into growth, or you will step back into safety” so let’s take the bull by the horns and get yourself some business growth this week!

Your challenge is to make a short video and get it in front of your leads and customers within the next 7 days.

Here is your action list:

  1. Make a 2 minute video using a webcam, smartphone, iPad, or video camera (basically ANYTHING you can get your hands on that records video).
    Don’t worry about making it super high quality, just get going! In your video talk about an offer you’re doing, a product or service that your customers may not know you do, or just answer a common question or problem you hear from your customers.
  2. Make sure that there is a clear and strong call to action at the end of your video.
    Tell your viewers exactly what to do next – e.g. “send me an email with the word “video” in the subject line to get more info on the offer”, or “call my office before Friday and ask to speak to Jane to get a free trial of this new service” etc. If you don’t tell people EXACTLY what to do next, chances are they’ll do nothing.
  3. Upload your video to YouTube.
    It couldn’t be easier to use YouTube these days – log in or create an account, click the ‘upload’ button and away you go.
  4. Embed your YouTube video on your website if you can.
    If you are able to edit your website and create new pages then click the ‘share’ link below your video on YouTube and then click ‘embed’ to get the code to paste into your website. If you can’t do this, don’t worry, you can just send your customers a link to the YouTube page (and then come talk to me because being able to edit and update your website easily is a MUST for online success).
  5. Send an email to your customers and leads to let them know you’ve made a video for them.
    Have a bit of fun with the email, write it like you’re writing to a friend, no one needs another boring corporate style email in their lives! And don’t overcomplicate it, the purpose of your email is to get them to click the link to watch the video, nothing else

Video Succeeds in Email Marketing: 6 Out of 10 Marketers Use It

By Troy Dreier ⋅ November 12, 2013 ⋅  Print This PostPost a comment

Filed Under  email, marketing, survey

 

Would you believe that 60 percent of U.S. marketers are using video in their email campaigns? It’s a surprisingly high number, since videos themselves can’t be included in email messages. But that’s one finding in the third annual business video marketing survey conducted by the Web Video Marketing Council. This is OnlineVideo.net’s third and final look at that report.

That 60 percent figure is an increase from 52 percent the year before. The survey also found that 26 percent of marketers are thinking about using video in email campaigns.

Since almost no email clients or ISPs (internet service providers) support videos embedded directly in an email, the survey asked marketers how they were using it. The highest number — 51 percent — link to a video landing page or a video in a website. Next, 24 percent link to a video player, 4 percent link to a page on a  video sharing network, and 3 percent put an animated GIF in their emails.

Even though marketers need clever workarounds to give the appearance of video in an email campaign, 34 percent of respondents rated video email marketing as very effective and 48 called it somewhat effective. This is a slight decrease from the previous year. Perhaps that’s because the novelty of email marketing is diminishing, the survey suggests. Still, over 60 percent of the respondents said that customers were more likely to make a sale after viewing a video email



Read from OnlineVideo.net’s – Video Succeeds in Email Marketing: 6 Out of 10 Marketers Use It http://www.onlinevideo.net/2013/11/video-succeeds-email-marketing-6-10-marketers-use/#ixzz2kSFrTLkY

 

US Time Spent on Mobile to Overtake Desktop

Aug 1, 2013

Nonvoice mobile activity to account for nearly 20% of media time

Mobile has become so key to consumers’ lives that for the first time this year, time spent on nonvoice mobile activities will surpass time spent online on desktop and laptop computers, eMarketer estimates.

US adults will spend 44.4% of their overall media time with digital this year, including 19.8% on mobile—compared to 19.5% on laptops and PCs. Time spent with mobile phones and tablets, excluding voice calls, has risen from 13.5% of all media time last year, and has nearly tripled since 2011.

 

eMarketer’s estimates of time spent with media include all time spent within each medium, regardless of multitasking. Consumers who spend an hour watching TV while multitasking on tablet devices, for example, would be counted as spending an hour with TV and an additional hour on mobile.

The shift from desktop to mobile, whether smartphone or tablet, is happening across a variety of activities, including social networking and digital video viewing. And tablets are key to the trend. As social networking and video reach plateaus in terms of share of total desktop time (around 29% and 18%, respectively), these activities are growing more quickly on smartphones, and especially tablets. The share of all tablet time spent with video, for example, will nearly double this year, from 10% to 19%.

 

Time Spent Shopping Shifts From PC To Mobile

by Mark Walsh, Aug 9, 2013

 

Time spent visiting retail Web sites on tablets and smartphones has eclipsed that of time spent shopping via the desktop. A combined 51% of time on retail sites took place on devices as of February 2013 (37% on smartphones, 14% on tablets) compared to 49% on PCs, according to a new study by mobile ad network Millennial Media and comScore.
 
Who’s shopping on mobile devices? More than half the U.S. audience is men (52%) and 48% women, with most in the 18 to 44 age range. Nearly half (48%) have an Android smartphone, and 45% own an iPhone. Tablet owners tend to skew more affluent, with more than half with household incomes higher than $75,000, and 47% access retail content.

The comScore study suggest most smartphone owners (55%) have used their handsets while in stores to compare prices, and 52% have made online purchases.
 
Other common in-store mobile activities include scanning a product barcode (58%),  researching product features (57%), finding a store location (50%), and checking product availability (47%), and finding coupons or deals (44%).
 
Store locators may be a more effective tactic to use with men, while ads linking to a social network may be more effective with women, and can be targeted accordingly,” noted the study. Price is overall the biggest factor when it comes to making a purchase on a smartphone, with nearly three-quarters (73%) citing it as a key consideration.

Other things influencing a purchase include customer reviews (35%), mobile coupons (33%), expert reviews (24%), store rewards (23%), a company-sponsored social site (19%), and personal recommendations (18%). The report pointed out that mobile coupons and rewards are also price-related tools retailers can use to incentivize buying.

Clothing tops the list of non-digital products that people are buying on smartphones (39%), followed by tickets (24%), physical books (23%), meals for delivery or pick-up (22%) and consumer electronics (21%). Purchases on tablets followed a similar pattern, with clothing the most popular category by a wider margin (54%), followed by books (29%), tickets (24%), daily deals (23%), and consumer electronics (22%).

The main goals of mobile campaigns by far are driving foot traffic (37%) and driving site/mobile traffic (34%). Increasing brand awareness was the aim of 14% of ad efforts. National brands account for the largest chunk of retail ad dollars, at 34%, trailed by computers and electronics firms (21%), clothing and luxury brands (19%), online retailers (10%), and home and garden sellers (9%).

The findings were based on comScore’s MobiLens and Tablens U.S. Surveys in March 2013

 

Time Spent Shopping Shifts From PC To Mobile

by Mark Walsh, Aug 9, 2013, 8:50 AM

Bottom of Form

 

Time spent visiting retail Web sites on tablets and smartphones has eclipsed that of time spent shopping via the desktop. A combined 51% of time on retail sites took place on devices as of February (37% on smartphones, 14% on tablets) compared to 49% on PCs, according to a new study by mobile ad network Millennial Media and comScore.
 
The desktop share is down from 84% in 2010. But comScore indicates that while time spent is shifting toward mobile, it’s helping extend the desktop audience by 45% as consumers that start on PCs continue their shopping experience across devices. So there’s a fair amount of overlap among platforms.
 
Who’s shopping on mobile devices? More than half the U.S. audience is men (52%) and 48% women, with most in the 18 to 44 age range. Nearly half (48%) have an Android smartphone, and 45% own an iPhone. Tablet owners tend to skew more affluent, with more than half with household incomes higher than $75,000, and 47% access retail content.
 
Much of the discussion around mobile shopping has focused on how people are using devices in stores. The Millennial
/comScore study doesn’t directly address the issue of showrooming, but it does suggest most smartphone owners (55%) have used their handsets while in stores to compare prices, and 52% have made online purchases.
 
Other common in-store mobile activities include scanning a product barcode (58%),  researching product features (57%), finding a store location (50%), and checking product availability (47%), and finding coupons or deals (44%).
 
The study also highlighted gender differences in shopping, with women a third more likely to use their phones for social actions like texting a friend or family member about a product. Men, meanwhile, are two-thirds less likely to scan a barcode or compare prices.

“Store locators may be a more effective tactic to use with men, while ads linking to a social network may be more effective with women, and can be targeted accordingly,” noted the study. Price is overall the biggest factor when it comes to making a purchase on a smartphone, with nearly three-quarters (73%) citing it as a key consideration.

Other things influencing a purchase include customer reviews (35%), mobile coupons (33%), expert reviews (24%), store rewards (23%), a company-sponsored social site (19%), and personal recommendations (18%). The report pointed out that mobile coupons and rewards are also price-related tools retailers can use to incentivize buying.

Clothing tops the list of non-digital products that people are buying on smartphones (39%), followed by tickets (24%), physical books (23%), meals for delivery or pick-up (22%) and consumer electronics (21%). Purchases on tablets followed a similar pattern, with clothing the most popular category by a wider margin (54%), followed by books (29%), tickets (24%), daily deals (23%), and consumer electronics (22%).

Retailers haven’t shied away from mobile advertising, ranking as the top-spending industry category on the Millennial network during the fourth quarter of 2012, and the fourth-highest in the first quarter, behind telecom, entertainment and finance.

Retail ad spending in the first quarter was up 10% from a year ago. “From this already large, established base of spending, retail brands have begun to shift their mobile advertising strategies. Retail advertisers are allocating their mobile spend differently, towards more innovative targeting features,” stated the report.

The main goals of mobile campaigns by far are driving foot traffic (37%) and driving site/mobile traffic (34%). Increasing brand awareness was the aim of 14% of ad efforts. National brands account for the largest chunk of retail ad dollars, at 34%, trailed by computers and electronics firms (21%), clothing and luxury brands (19%), online retailers (10%), and home and garden sellers (9%).

The findings were based on comScore’s MobiLens and Tablens U.S. Surveys in March with 32,088 mobile users aged 13 and older, and 6,796 tablet users, respectively. Data also came from comScore’s Mobile Metrix 2.0 service as of March, and Millennial’s first-quarter SMART report



Read more: http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/206417/time-spent-shopping-shifts-from-pc-to-mobile.html#ixzz2cQ2yQ9hC

 

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